17 4 / 2014

vaughnbodyarts:

Juliet is celebrating her birthday and treated herself to a very fancy looking ear. 
We pierced her conch and helix and she picked out these two anatometal threaded clusters with mint green and CZ gems. 
Such a gorgeous combo. 
Thank you, Juliet!

vaughnbodyarts:

Juliet is celebrating her birthday and treated herself to a very fancy looking ear. 

We pierced her conch and helix and she picked out these two anatometal threaded clusters with mint green and CZ gems. 

Such a gorgeous combo. 

Thank you, Juliet!

(via anatometal)

16 4 / 2014

Anonymous asked: Assuming that Claire's isn't the best option for buying nose studs and hoops, what is your opinion on Claire's jewelry? Do you know where they get it from and if they are sanitary? Thanks xx. :)

I wouldn’t get pierced at or purchase jewellery at Claire’s if it were the last shop on the planet, to tell you the truth!

Seek out a reputable body piercer in your area. Hell, most piercers are happy to send you jewellery if you live far away!

Hope this helps!

xx Dimmie

15 4 / 2014

deathbeforedigital:

Aw yiss, purple opal overload…awesome jewelry from Anatometal and NeoMetal. #2legit2quit #lifeistooshorttowearshittyjewelry #anatometal #neometal #stretchednostrils #stretchedphiltrum #stretchedlabret #stretchedearlobes #legitbodyjewelry

deathbeforedigital:

Aw yiss, purple opal overload…awesome jewelry from Anatometal and NeoMetal. #2legit2quit #lifeistooshorttowearshittyjewelry #anatometal #neometal #stretchednostrils #stretchedphiltrum #stretchedlabret #stretchedearlobes #legitbodyjewelry

(via anatometal)

15 4 / 2014

alanvedge:

Cultural Appropriation and Body Modification

alanvedge:

So, while the body modification debates what I consider a pretty cut-and-dry case of white privilege (whether or not white dudes should be walking around wearing swastikas) can we now open the dialogue* on cultural appropriation in the body modification industry/subculture?

A few common things I…

Forgive me if I’m doing this wrong… I’m not very good with the whole Tumblr thing.  Either way, I wanted to keep this all in one thread rather than having the conversation spread across multiple venues.  Alicia Cardenas from Sol Tribe in Denver wrote a response to this comment I posted.  There’s some good stuff in it and it’s definitely worth a read.

I’d like to respond to it though as I think a lot of my point may have been misunderstood.

I tried to stress in my initial post that I am in NO WAY an authority on this matter.  My only role in this conversation is to bring it to the surface in the industry because it doesn’t seem to be on the radar and it’s something that we should all be aware of and taking into consideration regardless of where we choose to draw our boundaries.

Nowhere in that initial post did I claim personal perfection either.  My initial interest in this conversation actually began when I read this article by Breeze Harper — someone who I’ve followed for a while now and really love her intersectional discussions around the animal rights movement.  Essentially, the article calls out white people with dreadlocks, heavy black tattoos, and stretched ears.  My initial reaction was “Holy shit… that sounds  pretty familiar, and I definitely am not trying to offend anyone!” so I delved deeper into the conversation.  It definitely took me a bit of time and a lot of reading to formulate my own opinions on the subject beyond my initial reactions of guilt then knee-jerk “Don’t tell me what to do!” before realizing this is actually a really interesting conversation that has a lot more depth to it than what I had ever been aware of.

One of the things I agree strongly with Alicia on is that tattooing and piercing both have a really cross-cultural history.  It’s hard to find a single culture that hasn’t modified their body in some way or another.  So to those who fall to one extreme side of the conversation and claim that ALL piercing and tattooing is cultural appropriation I do disagree.  I think tattooing and piercing is something that draws us all together and permeates humanity.

My point is that there are contexts where some piercings, some tattoos, a specific piece of jewelry, etc. is uniquely tied to a culture and to assume that you can take that image/style/etc. with no regard for the culture is a very bold assertion of privilege that I’m not really comfortable with.  Especially within the cultural context of institutional racism in the United States and the history of white settler culture.  

Regardless, I should point out once again that I am in no way an authority on deciding what is and is not off limits and where you should define your personal boundaries.

Most importantly:  Stop reading what I’m writing, and explore the conversations already happening on #culturalappropriation #settlercolonialism #whiteprivilege and #institutionalracism — there is a WEALTH of information and informed opinions out there.


Essentially, I’m going to keep this short so you can go out and read what people of color who have life experience with this stuff have written instead of my interpretation of what they’ve said second-hand.

13 4 / 2014

vaughnbodyarts:

Wow. This threaded cluster from anatometal has become our favorite. Our apprentice Brittney had Cody pierce her conch 5-6 months ago. She has a lot of gorgeous jewelry with Mint Green and CZ gems, so this was a perfect addition for her. The dark blue anodized titanium really makes these gems stand out. 

We still have a few clusters left, so be sure to stop by and pick one out before they’re gone! 

vaughnbodyarts:

Wow. This threaded cluster from anatometal has become our favorite.

Our apprentice Brittney had Cody pierce her conch 5-6 months ago. She has a lot of gorgeous jewelry with Mint Green and CZ gems, so this was a perfect addition for her. The dark blue anodized titanium really makes these gems stand out. 
We still have a few clusters left, so be sure to stop by and pick one out before they’re gone! 

13 4 / 2014

plugporn:

Chrysocolla Druzy Teardrops by Alternative Earth Organics

(Source: etsy.com)

13 4 / 2014

mateoway:

19mm Rough faced Amethyst Labret for Devin.

12 4 / 2014

Anonymous asked: Does piercing the nipples *really* inhibit breast feeding later? Are there any risks to piercing the nipples in regards to breast feeding later in life? Thanks!

safepiercing:

In our collective, massive experience, we have no awareness of even a single case of a woman who wished to breast feed and could not as a result of having had a nipple piercing. The milk ducts are a multiplicity of little pore-like ducts. Therefore, the likelihood of closing them all off from a piercing of usual size is virtually nil.

Most women do remove their jewelry for breast feeding and we believe this to be appropriate. As a result, some milk may come from the site of the piercing during nursing, which is not harmful nor problematic. Some will use an insertion taper (a tool designed for this purpose) to facilitate reinsertion or to check regularly and make certain the holes are open.

http://www.safepiercing.org/piercing/faq/#breastfeeding

Cody Vaughn - APP Outreach Committee

12 4 / 2014

alanvedge:

So, while the body modification debates what I consider a pretty cut-and-dry case of white privilege (whether or not white dudes should be walking around wearing swastikas) can we now open the dialogue* on cultural appropriation in the body modification industry/subculture?

A few common things I see just off the top of my head that we might want to reconsider:

-Using culturally significant names for westernized piercings (ie. “Bindi” and “Sadhu” piercings)

-Wearing culturally significant jewelry with no regard to the culture it came from.

-Stealing the names of rituals, mimicking them, and/or taking elements from and using them outside of their cultural history. (“Kavadi” and “Sundance” rituals.

-Wearing cultural people as tattoos or on clothing, often a bastardized and racist stereotype of the culture. (“Indian girl” tattoos with headdresses and face paint, “Gypsy” tattoos, etc.)

-Stealing culturally significant tattoo imagery, jewelry designs, etc. (Especially when that jewelry is then produced by exploiting other people of color in developing nations)

-Wearing other cultures’ clothing as costumes for events

I’m not laying down a rulebook here. I’m not authority. I’m still on the fence about my thoughts and feelings about particular issues. I’m just saying that as a subculture the body modification community needs to look at our actions and ask ourselves whether we want to flex our privileges and continue the white settler status-quo or if we want an inclusive environment that doesn’t alienate those outside of it. Here are a few things to think about that might help, but as a white/cis/male I’m well aware of my own privilege and would love to hear others’ voices on this topic:

Listen instead of talking:

The next time a person of color questions your swastika tattoo, maybe ask them how they feel about it and whether it makes them uncomfortable rather than just asserting your “right” to wear it.

Consider how your actions affect others:

Rather than selfishly flexing your privilege ask yourself how your actions might affect others. Sure, a comic has the “right” to go on stage in black face, but do you want to be that guy or do you want to avoid looking like a jerk? How is your indian girl-head tattoo with her headdress and face paint any different than a black-face tattoo or a racist sports mascot? It’s not.

Similarly, how is a young Hindu woman going to feel when she sees you wearing a knock-off of her once-in-a-lifetime special wedding nostril jewelry through a pair of acrylic eyelets in your ears? Especially if you’re wearing a matching “Bali flower” threaded top on your “Bindi” piercing? Taking something with cultural significance and stealing it to use as a fashion statement is a pretty settler-ist thing to do. Is that what we want this industry/culture to represent?

Remember that inclusivity requires proactive measures.

Those of us with privileges should be using that to elevate the voices of others in our community and reaching out to those who may feel initially left out rather than asserting opinions and alienating them.

I know a lot of us got into this industry because of our interest in other cultures. We just need to be careful that our interest doesn’t bleed over into appropriation. By all means study, learn, and appreciate the diverse cultural history of body modification but let’s stop appropriating those ideas and stealing them for our own fashion uses.

*The dialogue is already open for the record… I just don’t see it very often brought up WITHIN the piercing community. Outside of the core group of professionals I tend to follow there is a vibrant and interesting discussion on what is, isn’t, and might be cultural appropriation.

YES ALL OF THIS.

All of those points are things I have brought up in discussions about this during the week.

Our entire industry has to think about this, because at this point almost every facet has been affected by cultural appropriation. And frankly some of the reactions have been less than ideal, and I can’t tell if its because they think white people have the right to take these symbols, or if they just hate JC. I can understand the latter, but don’t use it as an excuse to not zoom out and look at the bigger conversation and scrutinise our behaviours.

(Re-post as text not a link because mobile app is silly)

11 4 / 2014

lipstickandzombies:

All my pretties from Anatometal! Amethyst and tangerine cz set in copper titanium. Fucking gorgeous.

Whitney is so wonderful for ordering and installing these for me. And of course for doing the triangle and nipple piercings.

WOW This colour combination is fantastic!

(via safepiercing)