27 8 / 2014

Anonymous said: Do you know any piercers who live in New Zealand?

twenty-seventimes:

tobiasxva:

Offhand, no.  Try checking with Kyle:  rats-in-the-walls

NinjaFlower and Absolution!

Dayna at The Tattooed Heart (Auckland) too! :)

I have personally been pierced by Scott at Ninjaflower (Wellington) and its a BEAUTIFUL shop, and Scott is amazeballs and I’d recommend him to absolutely anyone. (And like if you’re visiting Wellington and you like beer you should visit Little Beer Quarter around the corner from Ninjaflower because that place is the fucking bombdiggity!).

Eden and Daniel at Absolution (ChristChurch) are both wonderful people and great friends, and both are hella committed to the highest standards possible.

27 8 / 2014

tribute-to-a-shithead:

persephonebodypiercing:

Yes hello I’d like to talk to you about Moon Prism Power…

I got this 18k moon for my third eye but it totally didn’t work, so whatever vertical philtrum is good too, hey?

My face is kind of a hot mess of different companies, so let me list them.. My septum and cheek jewellery is by Body Vision, my nostril pieces are by Neometal, my third eye and vertical philtrum pieces are by Anatometal, and my labret was made by Tam Gannon.

My piercings themselves were performed over the years by Vogue peeps Lori (third eye, cheeks, vertical philtrum), Sana (double nostrils), and Warren Hiller (septum). My labret is by Scott at Ninjaflower in Wellington, NZ.

Can we talk about how on point their everything is?

Thank you, tumblr person! :) <3

PS: Thanks everyone for your lovings and likings and rebloggings of my stuff (‘specially my face!). <3 You’re all wonderful!

27 8 / 2014

Anonymous said: How old are you?

tobiasxva:

persephonebodypiercing:

perrymdoig:

Twenty-five

Whaaat! I thought you were older than that!

Same.  Maybe it’s perrymdoig's superb facial hair skills that's throwing us off.

It is truly magnificent facial hair, if we’re being honest!

27 8 / 2014

Anonymous said: How old are you?

perrymdoig:

Twenty-five

Whaaat! I thought you were older than that!

27 8 / 2014

bootstrapbilly said: What's your opinion on people such as Russ Foxx, Chase Campbell, Pineapple, etc?

richardeffinivey:

The following isn’t an attack on any of the people you mentioned specifically…

Here’s the deal. Sutures, anesthetics, that kind of stuff… it’s surgery. As far as I know, no body modification artists are licensed surgeons. That doesn’t mean these “heavy” practitioners can’t be safe, or knowledgeable, but it means laws are being broken when they execute procedures on people. That’s all fine and dandy, really, if both parties are aware of the risks - largely that the practitioner doesn’t have the ability to really and truly “fix” things that might go wrong (prescribing medication, malpractice insurance that would cover hospital visits, etc.).

I really don’t think many people who offer these procedures are telling this to their clients - sure, some do, but a lot don’t. This promotes the mindset we see of “OMG, so and so is in town, I’m going to get my _______ split / removed / altered / reversed”, and not “OMG, I’m spending tons of money to have someone who most likely didn’t complete college do surgery on me, and if something goes wrong, I’m on my own!” I know people with irreparable damage to their bodies from people who didn’t know how to say “I shouldn’t do this.” Clients of these practitioners think what they’re doing is a step cooler than tattoos and piercings, and feel pressured from their peers and role models to be more “extreme”. Cool points don’t cover hospital bills though.

I think the piercing industry has a habit of elevating the people who offer these procedures to a really high status, and I think that encourages people to view being a professional piercer as a stepping stone to being an underground surgeon. For every person out there I personally might trust to do these procedures on myself, there’s dozens of others solely out to make money and seek fame who are hurting people. It scares me that if I wanted, I could buy all the medical supplies I’d need to do an implant online far easier than I could buy the supplies to do a piercing with industry standard jewelry. It saddens me that people contact me all the time asking me to point their ears / do their implants / whatever when I have never even alluded to offering those procedures. I could easily just start doing this stuff, with no idea what I’m doing, and people are already lined up to give me money for it.

The most scary thing is that A LOT of the people offering this work shove it in the public’s face via social media, and because these people are “body piercers” in the eyes of government officials, when they decide to attack this stuff, they’re coming after ALL body piercers, not just the people offering this level of work.

27 8 / 2014

I did this navel piercing yesterday with a lime green opal by ANATOMETAL. All implant-grade titanium, all jewellery guaranteed for life against defects! Can&#8217;t get any better than that!

I did this navel piercing yesterday with a lime green opal by ANATOMETAL. All implant-grade titanium, all jewellery guaranteed for life against defects! Can’t get any better than that!

(Source: persephonebodypiercing)

25 8 / 2014

modificationnotmutilation:

Both of needles are fresh, never been used 16g. One of these needles is from Industrial Strength LLC, the other is from a catalog supply company. Can you guess which is which?

Sometimes catalogue companies will send me samples and catalogues (presumably because they Google for all the piercing shops?). I received one from a very popular company, that I know supplies a lot of the lower-end shops in my area, and the rest of Australia.
In this package, they included some samples of their branded needles, which were cut differently than the standard needles used within the piercing industry (not necessarily bad, but&#160;???). Not only that, but there were burrs on the cutting blade of the needle&#8230; that I could see very easily with my naked eye.
It isn&#8217;t just the piercer that matters, or the jewellery&#8230; the needles your piercer uses is important too.

modificationnotmutilation:

Both of needles are fresh, never been used 16g. One of these needles is from Industrial Strength LLC, the other is from a catalog supply company. Can you guess which is which?

Sometimes catalogue companies will send me samples and catalogues (presumably because they Google for all the piercing shops?). I received one from a very popular company, that I know supplies a lot of the lower-end shops in my area, and the rest of Australia.

In this package, they included some samples of their branded needles, which were cut differently than the standard needles used within the piercing industry (not necessarily bad, but ???). Not only that, but there were burrs on the cutting blade of the needle… that I could see very easily with my naked eye.

It isn’t just the piercer that matters, or the jewellery… the needles your piercer uses is important too.

(via safepiercing)

23 8 / 2014

bloody-sweet:

Large Gorilla Glass Lavender keyholes!

(via 5pointleo)

23 8 / 2014

Anonymous said: Is it safe to get a piercing with anodized jewelry?

safepiercing:

Yes, anodized jewelry is perfectly safe for an initial piercing (assuming the jewelry itself is an implant grade material with a proper surface finish and appropriate threading). 

So, there’s two kinds of colored jewelry you’ll find with body jewelry. 

PVD (physical vapor deposition)

In a nutshell, this is considered bad for fresh piercings, and arguably for healed piercings too. 

This method of coloring jewelry consists of thin films of a material being applied to the jewelry via a vacuum deposition process. You have likely seen this kind of jewelry at some retail stores that carry costume-type body jewelry.

This added film of material has a tendency of flaking off rather quickly when worn inside a body piercing. This can be problematic as the jewelry becomes quite unpleasant looking, and the small flakes can sometimes cause discomfort or irritation in a fresh piercing. 

For jewelry that needs to be bent to get on or off, captive bead rings for instance, the coating is even more prone to flaking off as it cannot flex or bend with the metal, the coated material breaks off. 

The metals we use in body piercing that can be anodized (titanium & niobium) cannot naturally turn red, white, orange or super shiny black, so you can easily spot PVD coated jewelry when you see these colors. 

Here are some examples of jewelry that I found labeled as “anodized steel” or “matte finish steel”. These are bad. 

image

^^The blue color on top can be achieved when anodizing titanium or niobium, but the red cannot. These are both PVD coated steel pieces. 

image

^^Here is another example of a color that body jewelry cannot safely turn to. This one is labeled as a “matte finish steel” ring. This too is not appropriate for fresh piercings. 

Niobium can turn black, but that is done with a heating process, causing the metals color to turn black from the inside out, not just on the surface, and it’s perfectly safe and will not flake off.

Though niobium can have a very nice dark black finish, it’s not that Batman super super black you see on PVD coated pieces. 

Currently, no body jewelry manufacturer that offers PVD coated jewelry can provide documentation (MSDS) to show the material they’re coating with is safe for long term wear inside the body.


Here’s an example of niobium that has had the heating process to change it’s color naturally to black: 
image

Titanium or Niobium anodized jewelry achieves its colors in a process where electricity is introduced to the metal, and is perfectly safe for fresh and healed piercings.

There are other metals and alloys that can be anodized, and some can turn other colors, such as red, but for the sake of body piercing jewelry we’re only dealing with titanium and niobium. 

Anodizing forces the titanium or niobium’s oxide layer to grow thicker. Basically, it screws up the way light bounces off the surface of the jewelry, giving us the effect of a copper, bronze, purple, etc. colored piece of jewelry. 



Here’s a nice video from APP member AJ Goldman demonstrating how anodizing is done: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eE-ZbAdJfWI



In some instances with anodized jewelry, the colors can start to fade or go back down the color chart (pictured below). This isn’t always the case, but sometimes this can be caused by body cleaning products or even your body’s own pH. This fading is not anything flaking off into your body, but rather the oxide layer being worn away, which poses no health concern to you or your fresh piercing. 

image




So some key notes regarding the metals we use in body piercing: 

Steel does not anodize. Its color cannot change unless it is PVD coated. Jewelry labeled as “anodized steel”, “titanium coated steel” or something similar is not appropriate for a fresh piercing.  

F136 or F67 titanium does not turn black. So jewelry labeled as “black titanium” is not appropriate for a fresh piercing.

Hope you find this helpful with picking out your future jewelry for initial piercings. 


Cody Vaughn - APP Outreach Committee



23 8 / 2014

pasaisti said: ive got quite sensitive ears and some of my piercings only work with certain metals, i was just wondering if you could recommend any websites to order top quality jewellery from?

I always recommend visiting your local reputable body piercing studio for high quality, properly fitted jewellery!

I can try to help find someone in your area, or I can refer you to a piercing studio nearby that might be able to ship you jewellery. :)